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half slave and half free. >> casting nims the mold of the great civil rights leaders he avowed action on series of issue from climate change to immigration reform. became the first president to use the word "gay" in an inaugural address. >> our journey is not complete until our wives, mothers and daughters can earn a living equal to the efforts. our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. >> debt and deficit front and center he offered a vigorous defense of entitlement programs. >> we must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of healthcare and size of the deficit. we reject that they must choose between caring that built the country. >> like every president since fdr, mr. obama started his day early, with a prayer service at st. john's church. before departing the white house for the longest motorcades known to man for the rise to the capital. a star-studded affair. where else do you see paul ryan mingling with jay-z and beyonce who belted out the national anthem. >> the ceremony was over there was a stream of pomp and
of the modern state of our lesbian, gay, bisexual, and trans tender civil rights movement. stone wall is the stonewall is really the way this movement kicked off. host: richard, connecticut, independent line. caller: i do not understand why you don't have someone from the opposition to this gentleman on the show, because it is is somewhat controversial subject and you have one view. that is very obvious to anyone watching the show. a second point is that, internationally, people like this gentleman who have support in the united states -- in many countries against the nets is, if you got now, ukraine, russia, hungary, dozens and dozens of nations are looking at the united states as an evil mention because tunnel men like this person -- gentleman like this person, " have lots of money and have more money than average americans, are going into these nations and promoting the homosexual lifestyle. in russia, they had a riot and had to shut down our professed homosexual demonstration in -- shut down a pro-homosexual demonstration because, was funded b -- was funded by american groups. and
's right, shep. you heard the president citing both of them, talking a lot about civil rights and really casting himself as someone who wants to carry on their civil rights legacies. i think the broadered message of that what it means in the current political environment is he made very clear that he just didn't win the last election. he believes he has a mandate. he believes he is going to be very aggressive in the days ahead. he was talking about taking action on climate change, immigration reform and at a time when everyone in washington is talking about debt and deficits. he also gave a very rigorous defense of entitlement spending, take a listen. >> the commitments we make to each other through medicare and medicaid security, these things do not sap our initiative. they strengthen us. [ applause ] they do not make us a nation of takers. they free us to take the risks that make this country great. [ applause ] >> now, interesting as well that the white house put out a tweet about another part of the speech where he said, quote: our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and
address and chronicles america's struggles for civil rights. i'll talk about the cultural impact of today's speech with jonathan altar and james peterson. stay tuned. you're watching the "ed show" on msnbc from washington. [ fishing rod casting line, marching band playing ] [ male announcer ] the rhythm of life. [ whistle blowing ] where do you hear that beat? campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it... in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. great taste. mmm... [ male announcer ] sounds good. it's amazing what soup can do. ♪ [ male announcer ] this is karen and jeremiah. they don't know it yet, but they're gonna fall in love, get married, have a couple of kids, [ children laughing ] move to the country, and live a long, happy life together where they almost never fight about money. [ dog barks ] because right after they get married, they'll find some retirement people who are paid on salary, not commission. they'll get straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritr
makes history in his second inaugural address and chronicles america's struggles for civil rights. i'll talk about the cultural impact of today's speech with jonathan alter and james peterson. stay tuned. you're watching the "ed show" on msnbc from washington. [ female announcer ] going to sleep may be easy, but when you wake up in the middle of the night it can be frustrating. it's hard to turn off and go back to sleep. intermezzo is the first and only prescription sleep aid approved for use as needed in the middle of the night when you can't get back to sleep. it's an effective sleep medicine you don't take before bedtime. take it in bed only when you need it and have at least four hours left for sleep. do not take intermezzo if you have had an allergic reaction to drugs containing zolpidem, such as ambien. allergic reactions such as shortness of breath or swelling of your tongue or throat may occur and may be fatal. intermezzo should not be taken if you have taken another sleep medicine at bedtime or in the middle of the night or drank alcohol that day. do not drive or operate mac
in 1963. one of the great heroes of the civil rights movement. myrlie evers-williams will be giving the invocation at the beginning of the ceremonies and then we will see justice sonia sotomayor who is one of the newer associate justices on the supreme court. she will be delivering the oath of office to the vice president. this is beyonce coming in now and we will be hearing from her. there are several musical performances today. after the vice president is sworn in, james taylor will be singing "america the beautiful." then following that, john roberts, jr., the chief justice of the united states will administer the oath of office to the president. we just saw 88-year-old jimmy carter arriving on the scene. former presidents are almost always in attendance at these events, but today, george herbert walker bush and his son, george w. bush are not in attendance. the elder mr. bush has recently been released from a month-long stay in the hospital due to a respiratory ailment and so both bush families announced that they would not be able to attend because of the poor health of the eld
on civil rights, but we can be right -- we can be first on human rights. instead of being laughed, we want to be first at something, and we believe being first ending abortion is a good thing. >> 3 hours drive from jackson, you have reached the mississippi delta. in one of the poorest parts of america, choosing to have an abortion is not an option for many women. they cannot afford to pay for the procedure. >> she is 13 years old. last month, she gave birth to her daughter. >> it is hard to go to school. i'm very sleepy. >> [indiscernible] >> gin at ground level has been working with pregnant teenagers in the delta and for 17 years. she is worried that the jackson clinic closes, more of these weylandt will have an unwanted pregnancies. -- more of these women will have unwanted pregnancies. >> [indiscernible] >> hsu became a mother two years ago when she had her daughter. now out of work, she is struggling with her decision not to become a mother again. >> i know this is something i have to do. i have to do this for me. >> bbc news, mississippi. >> the restriction of abortion rights 40 year
don't think i've seen a president do for civil rights leaders and later on had a private reception at the white house. >> how was his mood? >> very upbeat and hopeful. i think his speech was about him setting a tone for where he saw the rest of the century going. i don't think it was about four years for him. he's giving a vision. he thinks in terms, when he talks to us, about kennedy talking about the new frontier or johnson about the great society. i don't think everything he addressed yesterday was about everything he wanted to legislate, about where he sees the country going, his vision. >> an eye towards history. >> i think that's how he saw the inaugural address and he effectively did it. i think his specific of the next four years is the state of the union and his vision of "i had a cream." >> and what you said in the white house was illuminating. >> while you're drinking, everything i said was illuminating. >> amen. don't you wish that people in the pews could be drinking on those days? even your worst sermon would sound good. >> you described the president as relieved. i t
that are criticizing the president, it is civil rights rhetoric. they are the same republicans that would be criticizing jfk for dividing the republican ares back in the 1960s when they were trying to pass voting rights. >> they were democrats. >> there is one big challenge. reagan had reagan democrats and there is almost non existent in this country right now. and i think the way that he went through this address in a confrontational way sets up barriers for him. that was something that reagan was fantastic about. right now, obama has fractured capitol hill that not much is getting done. that is the challenge. >> we have to get out of here. he says the shrinking few do well while the growing group have trouble making it. and it isn't cleverly disguised. he won i get that. ramesh, thank you very much kevin and mark. top golfer complaining that he has a personal tax rate of 62%. because of the tax hike enacted in his home state of california. of course he is right on track. we have the answers next up. would define you as an innovator. to hold more than one patent of this caliber... would
" column as a difference between civil rights and civil liberties under this administration? guest: the inauguration speech was picking up a very common and almost mantra in the obama administration of achieving equality, which is a noble and important goal. i think the most significant thing about the inauguration speech, which are particularly thought was wonderful, was his reference to gay-rights and to the gay movement. it established his commitment to equality. i want to note that he has not been particularly aggressive in supporting gay rights in his first administration. his administration in court argued the same arguments as the bush administration. he still refuses to make clear his position on key legal aspects of gay-rights. and so, the first term obama was not nearly as passionate as that speech would suggest. but what was missing once again was a discussion of civil liberties. i think it does reflect this grewat this-- -- great schism in the democratic and liberal community. i wrote a column two years ago about how barack obama has destroyed the civil liberties movem
of the civil rights act and the voting changes that occurred then. but since then, we've heard no mention of the right to vote in this country being a protected right and the sanctity of that idea. i think the only thing -- first of all, we gotta remember, we vote every two years in this country. not every four. that needs to be the refrain from -- every time you talk about an election, anybody within the sound of my voice needs to -- when they talk about voting or any of those things or what's going to happen in the next election, you're not talking about 2016. you're talking about 2014. those often matter more so because that's when they sneak these folks through. that's when purple districts turn red because people are look the other way or are too busy. thanks for the call. appreciate it. we'll be back right after this. more of "the stephanie miller show". celebrating her mom's 90th birthday. >> she'll be back tomorrow though. >> she will. >> i'm sorry. that's inappropriate. >> announcer: it's "the stephanie miller show." desmond tutu said a quote that is one of my favorite quotes. "w
to a women's right to vote, of course. selma, alabama, the city where civil rights demonstrators fought for voting rights for african-americans in the march of 1965 only to be met violently by armed state troopers in a day that has since been known as bloody sunday. and the stonewall inn, often thought of the birthplace of the lgbt rights after a gay bar was raided by police in 1969 and for days became the site of protests and riots. here is the president yesterday. >> we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal, is the star that guides us still just as it guided our forbearers through seneca falls and selma and stonewall, just as it guided all those men and women, sung and unsung, who left footprints along this great mall to hear a preacher say that we cannot walk alone. to hear a king proclaim that our individual freedom is inextricably bound to the freedom of every soul on earth. >> the iconic nature of that speech, we americans love brands. we love iconic moments, whether it's the golden gate bridge or niagara falls or these things
. and then the third element was his expansion of civil rights where he talked about immigrants and gays and even shoehorned gun rights under the rubric of the security. he outlined the liberal agenda, the big-government agenda of the future. >>gretchen: i think there were two words that came out of it that summarized what charles was saying was that the president yesterday used these two words: collective action. if you parse those two words, it could bring you back to how he started in his career as a community organizer. >>steve: bob schieffer from cbs said there were no memorable lines in this speech. i think what is memorable is what his political director at cbs said in offering advice in a "slate" magazine column to the president. go for the throat of the g.o.p. listen. >> this article should scare anybody who has any doubts whatsoever about the media's impartiality. he is the news director, political director -- excuse me -- for cbs news. he writes a piece in which he calls for essentially an antidemocratic action. depoliticize the g.o.p. action. he believes obama at to delegitimize. it
into little rock. not into berlin, but little rock to enforce desegregation, he signed the first civil rights law since the civil war. he hardly spoke about that in the second inaugural. he mentioned it, but hardly. i think these presidents have no idea what they're about to encouldn'ter. >> and outside events end up shaping the legacy. the president's maximum political power and validation is right now in this moment and in the next year, and the question is, did he strike while the iron is hot, and take to the tendency which will be to appeal to the democratic base and try to ram something through, or does he do something which may be against his nature and try to reach out to republicans, work with maybe marco rubio on immigration, and try to have a real legacy. >> i think your former boss saying, i have political capital to spend and i'm going to spend it. do you see the same for president obama? >> i do. and the interesting thing is, mandates are that which you create as the president. you can create more and do more if you do well. if the economy comes back and you can convince people t
takes legislation that kennedy introduced, that was stalled, really was not going to pass, civil rights, the tax cut bill, and, in an instant, johnson gets it moving towards passage. >> thank you very much. >> chris: last fall, he took part in a library of congress book festival, on the national mall. and it was clear he made johnson come alive for many readers. >> chris: do you like him? >> i don't like him or dislike him, you are in awe of him because you are constantly saying, look what he's doing now! >> chris: he got excited talking about johnson's rist, as we tur book, he's writing now, about johnson's presidency and vietnam, his demeanor suddenly changed. >> the story is going to turn very dark as soon as vietnam enters the picture. it is sort of a tragic story. a story of his great dreams, that are destroyed by a war. >> chris: you are 76 now. do you ever worry that you are not going to have time to finish the last book? >> well, sure! but, you know, it is not productive to think like that. >> chris: how long do you think it will take you to finish? >> i could say three or four
senator baker's story about how the civil rights bill of 1968 was passed. i have discussed this with the republican leader before. he knows that era as well or better than i do but there was a time when senator baker said he was centered since office the man who had the job as senator mcconnell now has, he was a republican leader then and he said he heard the telephone rang and there was more than one into the conversation but senator dirksen was saying no mr. present i cannot come down and have an drink with you. i did that last night and -- is very unhappy with me. that was a conversation but 30 minutes later there was a rustle in the outer office in the republican leader's office the very office that senator mcconnell now holds and two beagles followed by the present united states came in and lyndon johnson the presence of their puppy and leader if you want have a drink with me i am down here to have one with you and they disappeared into the backroom for 45 minutes. the point of all that is not their socializing. the point was it was then that republican leaders offic
rights is of the same standing as the civil rights movement from selma to stonewall. wasn't president obama himself not in favor of gay marriage until six months ago? do you have to believe in same-sex marriage if you believe in the principles of the declaration of independence? i don't think so. i don't think most americans think that's just obviously the right thing to be for if you believe in the american declaration of independence and constitution. jon: always good to get your insights. bill kristol from "the weekly standard," thank you. arthel? arthel: we have a fox news extreme weather alert now as an arctic blast creates dangerous conditions across the country. police in ohio blaming sudden snow bursts for triggering a deadly chain reaction pile-up near cincinnati. one person died and at least 20 others were rushed to the hospital, some in critical condition. officers at the scene say there may have been 86 cars involved in that crash. while a separate crash in the same area damaged up to 50 more cars. the snow causing horrible conditions there, in new york as well, in our law
on to dave, a republican in indiana. caller: hello, c-span. you talk about rights. civil rights, gay rights, and all that. what about the rights of the unborn? don't they have any rights in this country anymore? second, if he is so wanting to come to either do what is right for the country, why does he go outside and do executive orders when he does not get his way? host: we're talking about president obama's second inaugural address. if you missed any part of it yesterday, go to our website c- span.org and watch it there. we covered it throughout the day including the speech, congressional luncheon, and the parade. all of that on c-span.org. gary on twitter says -- host: terry, republican in north carolina. caller: hello, i would like to see obama start his second term off a little bit better. i would like to hold c-span to what they were supposed to do on his first term. quit having the meetings behind closed doors but you guys are supposed to have the cameras in the room. host: we would have cameras in the room if it was allowed. caller: well, you see, that is what he promised last time.
, as if that was -- he called it some sort of new, modern civil rights movement, which is kind of ridiculous. it really left a poor taste i think in a lot of people's mouths. jon: charlie hurt from the washington times. it's good to have you on. thank you, char here. >> thanks, jon. heather: coming up next secretary of state hillary clinton facing tough questions about the terror attack in benge, libya. but what more did we learn about the administration's response to the murder of ambassador christopher stevens and three other americans? we'll take a look. and golf star phil michelson says taxes in california, well they are so high he may have to leave. he's not a loan, though, thousands of californians are facing the possibility of losing mor more than half their income to the tax man. we'll take a look at why. (announcer) at scottrade, our clients trade and invest exactly how they want. with scottrade's online banking, i get one view of my bank and brokerage accounts with one login... to easily move my money when i need to. plus, when i call my local scottrade office, i can talk to someone who knows
the call to serve throughout his career. his work on issues from education and transportation to civil rights and national service has advanced the causes of our party immeasurably. please join me in thanking our retiring officers. [applause] they have done a remarkable service for the entire country. [applause] >> now, let me introduce our slate of new dnc officers. they are a talented, dedicated and passionate group of people who will strengthen and energize our party. maria elena will serve as vice chair of the dnc. maria's work as executive secretary-treasurer at the los angeles county federation of labor and years of service reaffirm our party's steadfast commitment to american workers. maria will strengthen the already-powerful bond between the dnc and our brothers and sisters in the labor movement. my friend, congresswoman gab earth of hawaii, with your support today will serve as ice varian. a-- vice chair. along with our colleague of illinois is also one of the first female combat veterans to serve in congress. [applause] congresswoman's story is an inspiration and showcases t
to stonewall in such a clear and simple phrase he captured the struggle of some many of us, the civil rights challenge of so many of us. we need to engage in the conversation. host: what do you expect from the congress in this area? guest: much has happened in the congress. out efforts were mostly about blocking bad things from happening. we did that in the early 2000's. i see parallels with reducing gun violence with marriage equality and support for the gay and lesbian community. we see support from republicans for marriage equality and support from democrats. continued efforts to pass the respect for marriage act, which would get rid of the defense for marriage act. i see the courts -- the supreme court is taking up marriage equality. they will be heard in march with a decision heard in june. there has been a shift in public attitudes, just as i see a shift on reducing gun violence. host: good morning. caller: i watch the news a lot and i see the shootings and the mass shootings are committed by the mentally ill. i have a son and i see this and my son. no gun control law would control him
-- we had desegregation in the military in 1948. the civil rights act was passed in 196. equal pay for men and women in decades. something the society still can't claim to have. this is not about set asides or quotas but saying we will open the field for those who are capable of filling it in. in no way does it endanger national security if you have people who are qualified to serve in those roles. >> do you think there were opportunities you missed out on because of a policy like this and other women, the opportunities missed out on whether pro-potion motions or advancement? give us an idea how much women have been missing out on. >> a young woman came through boot camp with me and she signed up literally to fight. she was assigned to be a baker in the mess hall. she cried her eyes out for days because she wasn't going to serve on the front lines. i met every physical, emotional and mental challenge to serve on the front line but i'm 4'11" and i need an ammo box to shoot out of the fox hole. i don't belong on the front line. but the women who do meet those standards, it ought to b
and 60's, those opposed to civil rights tried this, if you do that, we're going to boycott your business, and that didn't work out well for the government leaders who tried to do that and those were constitutional, and the idea he would take a constitutionally protected right and use it as a weapon, if you do business with these companies, banks, well, then you're going to have a price to pay. what, chicago is going to threaten, we won't do business with the banks if they do business with a third party. >> megyn: one thing if the private citizen did it. the citizenry said we don't want you to do business with any gun manufacturer. >> free speech. >> megyn: until they get on board with president obama's proposal, but when you have the government basically, official, coming in and strong arming somebody that raise tz it to another level, does it not, jay. >> yes. >> megyn: and sets a precedent the other side may be unhappy with when there are different people in power. >> and it may be different issues. we're talking about the second amendment today, but it could be something else. the ide
system. labor organizations, civil rights groups called for action, including those young immigrants who are willing but unable to enter the military. >> they let me know you're undocumented. you can't register. >> he's willing to fight and die for the united states of america. there's just one problem. the arizona resident does not have legal documents to live in the country. >> if you believe in something and you're willing to die for it, that's all it comes down to. >> reporter: as an immigrant brought to this country by his parents when he was 4, the 19-year-old callfies for what is known as deferred action. president obama's policy allows some young immigrants who meet age, education, criminal background requirements to stay in the country temporarily without fear of deportation, but it does not allow them to serve in the armed forces, which is something that arizona resident maria diaz, is also trying to do. >> would you be willing to join the military yourself? and if you aren't, then why would you turn down somebody who is willing to die for a nation that it's all they have known
accomplish a lot. >> absolutely. look at what eisenhower did. he dealt with little rock and civil rights. ike created nasa created anwar de demilitarized antarctica. and bill clinton, what would he have been without a second term. he's able to go around and talk about surplus because he had a second term. ronald reagan. i'm tire of hearing about iran-contra. diplomacy with gorbachev was a big deal. >> so you're not worried about the second term. >> not only am i not, the president can't be. >> make sure his team is focused the agenda and getting things >>> good morning. sun and clouds around today. it's going on a chilly one, but not as cold as four years ago. 34 now in town. 28 across the bay. good looking day today. inauguration day. sunshine, some clouds, breezy, chilly, some late afternoon flurries and snow >>> there's a record number of women in the new congress however, they are still far outnumbered by the men. we'll ask three female senators just why they think that is ahead on "cbs this morning" from washington. we'll be right back. thn this morning's "
whether it is leading efforts to enforce sanctions on iran, your work supporting women's rights around the world, engaging with civil society and restoring and maintaining american influence in a very difficult era. i would have thought your last hearing would be your chance to give us some advise for what to do over the next four years and beyond. i take seriously your strong advise because i lap to agree with it, it is about time we pass an authorization bill for both houses of congress. instead, we are here in our third hearing to deal with the tragic events this benghazi because it is a chance for each political party to beat up on the other. we can talk about how republicans didn't provide you with resources. we can talk about the administration inside the state department. i would hope maybe we can get you to come back again. i realize that would be gratis, you would not be on the government payroll and do the hearing i would like to have which is getting your input on the bigger issues of foreign policy. ultimately the security of our diplomats depends on the host country. this
supporting women's rights around the world and engaging with civil society and restoring and maintaining influence in a very difficult era. i would have thought that your last hearing would be a chance to give us advice for what to do-ovdo over the next four years and beyond. i take seriously your strong advice that it's about time we pass a reauthorization bill through both houses. instead we are here on i guess the third hearing to deal with the tragic events of benghazi because it's a chance to beat up on the other party. we can talk about how you were not provided with resources and the administration inside the state department. i hope that maybe we would get you to come back again. i realize that would be gratis. you wouldn't be on the payroll at that time. with the hearing i would like to have, getting your input on the bigger issues of foreign policy. ultimately the security of our diplomats depens on the host country. this is all a discussion about there might have been five security people on the ground if only there was more funning and deployment and that cable and this cable
'sritis around the world, en-- women's rights around the world, engaging in civil society and restoring and maintaining american influence in a very difficult era. and i would have thought that your last hearing would be your chance to give us some advice for what to do over the next conscious over the next four years and beyond. i take seriously your very strong advice because i happen to agree with it, that it's about time we pass an authorization bill through both houses of congress. but instead we're here at i guess our third hearing to deal with the tragic events in benghazi because it is a chance for each political party to beat up on the other. we can talk about how republicans didn't provide you with resources, we can talk about the administration inside the state department. so i would hope that maybe we'd get you to come back again. i realize that would be grats i, you wouldn't be on the government payroll at that time and do the hearing that i'd like to have. which is getting your input on the bigger issues of foreign policy. ultimately the security of our diplomats depend on
's rights around the world, engaging with civil society, and restoring and maintaining american influence at a very difficult era. and i would have thought that your last drink would be your chance to give us some advice for what to do over the next, over the next four years and beyond. i take seriously your very strong advice, because i happen to agree with it, that it's about time we passed an operation bill through both houses of congress. but instead we're here, i guess our third hearing, to deal with the tragic events in benghazi because it is a chance for each political party to beat up on the other. we can talk about how republicans didn't provide you with resources. we can talk about the administration inside the state department. so i would hope that maybe we are did you to come back again. i realized that would be gratis. you wouldn't be on the government payroll at that time, and do the hearing that i would like to have, which is getting your input on the bigger issues of foreign policy. ultimately the secured of our diplomats depends on the host country. this is all a discussi
to enforce sanctions on iran, your work supporting women's rights are around the world, and teaching with civil society and maintaining american influence in a difficult era. i would have thought the last hearing would be your chance to give us some advice for what to do over the next four years and beyond. instead our third hearing to deal with the tragic events in benghazi because it is a chance for each political party to beat up on the other. we can talk about how republicans did not provide you with resources, the administration inside the state department. i would hope maybe we get you to come back again. i realize that would -- he would not be on the government table at that time. getting your input on the bigger issues of foreign policy. ultimately the security of our diplomats depends on the whole country. this is all a discussion about that might have been five security people on the ground. if only there had been more funding, this cable, that cable. much of the to more protection, might have led to more casualties. -- might have lead to more protection, might have led to
about women who are actively serving right now. what is the reaction? >> reporter: the reaction has been welcomed by those who joined the aclu, the american civil liberties union in suing panetta last year for these positions to open up. there were four service members who did sue panetta last year. secretary pa ne panetta had started this earlier in the year. he opened up 14,000 positions earlier this year. this is not new. i spoke to the first fighter pilot to fly in combat and she had this to say about the naysayers. >> the same arguments were being made back then that are being made now against this policy change that is happening in order to catch up with reality on the battlefield. and i know air combat is different from ground combat but they were making the same arguments back then, that women did not have the inch turns or the strength to be fighter pilots, and i had just completed the hawaii ironman triathlon, winning the division and beating most of the military men and they said i didn't have the endurance to be a fighter pilot. >> reporter: one marine garnered attention last
exhibition on the civil war is abolition and emancipation. we are fortunate that those men came of age when they did. they make issues around the emancipation and abolition issues around human rights and american freedom on a general non-race specific level. i will go through every piece of information that johnson was in this paper -- picture. if you pay attention to the top half as well as the bottom half, you will get a dark skinned black woman holding a white child. there is a ladder and a bolt of fabric coming out the other window. there is a rooster appear. roosters have a habit in the evening of finding a perch and call into the hands to spend the night with him. the hen is on top of the slate orders. if you add all of the inns and outs and look down here at the white girl answering the backyard -- entering the back yard, some of you have said she is coming to hear the music, she is the mistress. she is not here to see the music. no one is paying attention to her. is she a product of one of those liaisons? >> the civil war and its influence on american artist. part of american histor
. >> and so the killing just continues on the ground indefinitely, right? >> alas, and do we send in the marines or whatever we send in or we bomb them. >> and we get in the middle of a civil war and, of course, ends badly. and the region erupts. the russians. it seems to me that it's not in the russians' best interests in the long run to continue standing beside a tyrant who seems to me, if the past is prologue, cannot survive this in the long run. >> i think you're right in terms of the interests. but there is a peculiar aspect, namely putin's personality and personal obsessions. this is a man driven by nostalgia and resentment. he literally hates the fact that the soviet empire collapsed. he wants to recreate it. and he may be calculating that if we get bogged down in iran and in the region, he'll have an opening to crack down on something very important to europe and to us, georgia and as asser b azerbaijan. >> talking about the president needing more engagement, getting into areas where he can have a real impact, what does that look like, do you think, in this second term? wh
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